Supplementary Irregular Verb Form List (Module 14.150)

Teach-the-World

Irregular verbs are an important feature of the English language. Approximately 70% of the time when we use a verb in English, it is an irregular one. An irregular verb is a verb whose conjugation follows a different pattern, they are common verbs in the English language that do not follow the simple system of adding “d” or “ed” to the end of the word to form the past tense.

Word Formation (Module 13.150)

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Word formation is the creation of a new word; it’s sometimes compared with semantic modification, which is a change in a single word’s meaning. The most common type of word formation is the grouping of two (or more) nouns, resulting in a compounded form that sometimes generates a whole new meaning altogether as in ‘railroad’ (rail+road).

Conditional Sentences (Module 12.150)

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If I have enough money, I will go to America. (If clauses) conditional sentences are sentences expressing factual implications, or hypothetical situations and their consequences. They’re real, unreal (impossible) or improbable situations.

Reported Speech (Module 11.150)

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Reported Speech (also called Indirect Speech) is used to communicate what someone else said, but without using the exact words. They’re the speaker’s words reported in subordinate clauses governed by a reporting verb, with the required changes of person and tense (e.g., She said that she wouldn’t go, based on I won’t go).

Participles (Module 10.150)

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A participle is a form of a verb that is used in a sentence to indicate a past or present action and to modify a noun or noun phrase; it plays a similar role as an adjective (e.g., working man, burned toast) or a noun (e.g., good breeding). In English, participles are also used to make compound verb….

Phrasal Verbs (Module 9.150)

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A phrasal verb is an idiomatic phrase consisting of a verb and another element, typically either an adverb or a preposition. They usually take on a different meaning to that of the original verb. For example: lift up, break down, check in or get on with. Sometimes they have combination of both a preposition and adverb, such as look down on.

Connectives and Clauses (Module 8.150)

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Connectives are a word or phrase whose function is to link linguistic units together, sometimes referred to as conjunctions, for example: whoever, whatever, although and but. A clause may be either a sentence that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence, because it does not express a complete thought (a dependent or subordinate clause) or….

Gerunds (Module 7.150)

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A word form that is derived from a verb but that functions as a noun, in English ending in -ing, e.g., do you mind my asking you? Both gerunds and infinitives can be nouns, which mean they can do just about anything that a noun can do. Gerunds are formed with –ing, walking, talking or listening. Infinitives are formed by….

Active and Passive Voices (Module 6.150)

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An active voice is used to point out that the grammatical subject of the verb is performing the action or causing the happening signified by the verb; “The man tossed the apple’ uses the active voice”. The passive voice is used to point out that the grammatical subject of the verb is the receiver (not the source) of the action indicated by the verb; “`The apple was tossed by the man’ uses the passive voice”; “`The apple was tossed’ is an abbreviated passive”.

Determiners and Quantifiers (Module 5.150)

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Determiners and quantifiers are those little words that precede and modify nouns: You use a specific determiner when people know exactly which thing(s) or person/people you are talking about. They modify a word that determines the kind of reference a noun or noun group has, for example a, the, every. We use quantifiers when we want to give someone information about the number of something: how much or how many.